Acne Treatment Antibiotics

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Acne lesions are called every ugly name you care to think of including zits, spots, or pimples. Sometimes they grow beyond your face too, depending on how severely you are suffering from the skin disease, and may spread to your arms, shoulders and torso, or even to your back. That’s my personal favorite: back acne – bacne, for short.

Acne lesions develop as a result of blockages in the follicles of your skin. Due most often to hormone activities in your body, your sebaceous glands may secrete excess oils that mix with dust and dirt on your skin. Also, bacteria from the environment often get involved in the mix, resulting in infections and eventual inflammation.

If you are going to treat and cure this condition, you are going to have to attack the bacteria that are causing the complications. Several procedures have been tried since the beginning of time with varying results. But in the middle of the last century, Sir Alexander Flemming discovered penicillin, and with it the development of various antibiotics was realized. Today, antibiotics are about the best acne clear treatments under the sun, guaranteed to give you clear skin if you employ them the way that you should.

Meet the antibiotics: They are basically of two types – topical and oral antibiotics.

Oral antibiotics were the first to be discovered. They included tetracycline and a host of other related anti-acne medications that you had to swallow for full effect. They did not so much kill the bacteria, as have anti-inflammatory effects on the disease. They include erythromycin, oxytetracycline, doxycycline minocycline, and lymecycline. In the UK, the off-label trimethoprim is a bit more popular.

Topical antibiotics came shortly after and are often and largely used alongside the oral acne medications. You had to run them on your skin in the infected areas for them to clear your skin, and you had to do that about 2 times a day. Erythromycin is also a common name amongst topical antibiotics, as is tetracycline as well. Other trade names in this genre are stiemycin and clindamycin. They appear to have about the same effects as the oral types, but they have one advantage – they do not cause you stomach aches as side effects of treatment, which makes them better in a sense.

There is a catch, though. In recent times, a very resistant type of acne has been seen more and more frequently. These are P. acnes, and they appear to be a lot more resistant to antibiotics. Often, they have been found to bounce back just days after topical antibiotics are supposed to have done their job, and short week later, if you have been using the oral type of medication.

But until you have P. acnes, you can be confident that your acnes, the lesions, and the scarring that result are as good as history if you stick to your antibiotics.

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